#thebodykeepsthescore medias

Posts tagged on #thebodykeepsthescore

Top Posts Recent Posts

Top Posts

I see you over there carrying that heavy armor and showing up each and every day to do better, be better...me too, love, me too. ⁣⠀
⁣⠀
p.s. People thank me all the time for the safe container I create to confide in...I'm here if you need someone.⁣⠀
⁣⠀
*******⁣⠀
twitter cred to @dr.thema ⁣⠀
*******⁣⠀
#survivor #cptsd #hyperaware #drthema #thebodyremembers #thebodykeepsthescore.

I see you over there carrying that heavy armor and showing up each and every day to do better, be better...me too, love, me too. ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ p.s. People thank me all the time for the safe container I create to confide in...I'm here if you need someone.⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ *******⁣⠀ twitter cred to @dr.thema ⁣⠀ *******⁣⠀ #survivor #cptsd #hyperaware #drthema #thebodyremembers #thebodykeepsthescore ...

When I went to see a therapist for the first time, it was because I thought I needed help mentally coping with a physical chronic illness that was never going to get better. I was still in my early twenties, and I was feeling depressed about the loss of my health at such a young age. But to my complete surprise, the first session, all I could do was talk about my family. We didn’t even talk about my chronic illness, nor would we in the following sessions.
•
I woke up quickly to the fact that the relationships I had with my family members were severely dysfunctional. A lot of what I experienced while I lived at home had been abuse, and now that I was finally in a safe environment, I was able to see and process what had happened to me. I came out of the denial that I had wrapped around myself like a safety blanket. I am an abuse survivor.
•
The correlation between trauma and chronic disease is remarkable. Many of us with chronic pain and chronic illnesses are also living with the after-effects of trauma. Many of us have PTSD or Complex PTSD. I’ve had to live with this myself, and I know how hard it is to deal with the emotional flashbacks, night terrors, hypervigilance and dissociation. But through the practice of yoga, I am healing these wounds.
•
Along my journey, the most effective healing practice I have come across is the practice of Yoga Nidra. This is a guided meditation practice that systematically relaxes the body in order to relax the mind. It rebalances the nervous system and helps us to create new and healthy neural pathways in the brain. It also creates a connection between the conscious and the subconscious mind so that we can integrate and heal our memories in a safe environment.
•
Since I have been practicing Yoga Nidra on a regular basis, I have seen a drastic reduction in C-PTSD symptoms, and I can’t recommend this practice enough. If you’d like to learn more about this, feel free to send me a DM or tap the link in my bio. We are in this together ❤️
•
#spoonieyoga #spoonieyogatribe.

When I went to see a therapist for the first time, it was because I thought I needed help mentally coping with a physical chronic illness that was never going to get better. I was still in my early twenties, and I was feeling depressed about the loss of my health at such a young age. But to my complete surprise, the first session, all I could do was talk about my family. We didn’t even talk about my chronic illness, nor would we in the following sessions. • I woke up quickly to the fact that the relationships I had with my family members were severely dysfunctional. A lot of what I experienced while I lived at home had been abuse, and now that I was finally in a safe environment, I was able to see and process what had happened to me. I came out of the denial that I had wrapped around myself like a safety blanket. I am an abuse survivor. • The correlation between trauma and chronic disease is remarkable. Many of us with chronic pain and chronic illnesses are also living with the after-effects of trauma. Many of us have PTSD or Complex PTSD. I’ve had to live with this myself, and I know how hard it is to deal with the emotional flashbacks, night terrors, hypervigilance and dissociation. But through the practice of yoga, I am healing these wounds. • Along my journey, the most effective healing practice I have come across is the practice of Yoga Nidra. This is a guided meditation practice that systematically relaxes the body in order to relax the mind. It rebalances the nervous system and helps us to create new and healthy neural pathways in the brain. It also creates a connection between the conscious and the subconscious mind so that we can integrate and heal our memories in a safe environment. • Since I have been practicing Yoga Nidra on a regular basis, I have seen a drastic reduction in C-PTSD symptoms, and I can’t recommend this practice enough. If you’d like to learn more about this, feel free to send me a DM or tap the link in my bio. We are in this together ❤️ • #spoonieyoga #spoonieyogatribe ...

Self Care Sunday! REMINDER: (to self and everyone else 😌) self care is not just the commodified version we’re currently being sold, i.e. bath bombs, face masks, pedicures, chocolate, etc. .
Self-Care is also about responsibility and accountability, which comes from our adult self. We feel better when we stick to hygiene routines, keep our environment tidy, handle those pressing “to-do” items, keep our commitments to work and relationships, knock out that homework assignment, and do our best to stay on top of our responsibilities even when we’d rather do literally ANYTHING else. This clears up all that mental space that is bogged down by the anxiety that procrastination and avoidance inevitably brings. We don’t have to do it all at once either, because even small actions bring a sense of relief and accomplishment. Then we can take that hot bath or get that manicure and actually lean into it and fully relax. 🌟
.
NOTE: There will be days that we simply just can’t, especially for folks with chronic illness, different abilities, multiple jobs, single parents etc. This post is meant to be a reframing of self care, and doing our best is always good enough.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
#trauma #traumahealing #traumarecovery #traumainformed #traumasurvivor #traumatherapy #childhoodtrauma #complextrauma #ptsd #ptsdawareness #complexptsd # cptsd #embodied #selflove #depressionrecovery #balance #bodywork #mindfulness #selfcare #selfworth #therapy #emdr #thebodykeepsthescore #somatictherapy #selfcompassion #peterlevine #traumarevolution. 📷- @rosalarian.

Self Care Sunday! REMINDER: (to self and everyone else 😌) self care is not just the commodified version we’re currently being sold, i.e. bath bombs, face masks, pedicures, chocolate, etc. . Self-Care is also about responsibility and accountability, which comes from our adult self. We feel better when we stick to hygiene routines, keep our environment tidy, handle those pressing “to-do” items, keep our commitments to work and relationships, knock out that homework assignment, and do our best to stay on top of our responsibilities even when we’d rather do literally ANYTHING else. This clears up all that mental space that is bogged down by the anxiety that procrastination and avoidance inevitably brings. We don’t have to do it all at once either, because even small actions bring a sense of relief and accomplishment. Then we can take that hot bath or get that manicure and actually lean into it and fully relax. 🌟 . NOTE: There will be days that we simply just can’t, especially for folks with chronic illness, different abilities, multiple jobs, single parents etc. This post is meant to be a reframing of self care, and doing our best is always good enough. . . . . . . . . #trauma #traumahealing #traumarecovery #traumainformed #traumasurvivor #traumatherapy #childhoodtrauma #complextrauma #ptsd #ptsdawareness #complexptsd # cptsd #embodied #selflove #depressionrecovery #balance #bodywork #mindfulness #selfcare #selfworth #therapy #emdr #thebodykeepsthescore #somatictherapy #selfcompassion #peterlevine #traumarevolution . 📷- @rosalarian ...

We all know what happens when we feel humiliated: We put all our energy into protecting ourselves, developing whatever survival strategies we can. We may repress our feelings; we may get furious and plot revenge. We may decide to become so powerful and successful that nobody can ever hurt us again. Many behaviors that are classified as psychiatric problems, including some obsessions, compulsions, and panic attacks, as well as most self-destructive behaviors, started out as strategies for self-protection. These adaptations to trauma can so interfere with the capacity to function that health-care providers and patients themselves often believe that full recovery is beyond reach. Viewing these symptoms as permanent disabilities narrows the focus of treatment to finding the proper drug regimen, which can lead to lifelong dependence—as though trauma survivors were like kidney patients on dialysis.

It is much more productive to see aggression or depression, arrogance or passivity as learned behaviors: Somewhere along the line, the patient came to believe that he or she could survive only if he or she was tough, invisible, or absent, or that it was safer to give up. Like traumatic memories that keep intruding until they are laid to rest, traumatic adaptations continue until the human organism feels safe and integrates all the parts of itself that are stuck in fighting or warding off the trauma. 	Every trauma survivor I’ve met is resilient in his or her own way, and every one of their stories inspires awe at how people cope. Knowing how much energy the sheer act of survival requires keeps me from being surprised at the price they often pay: the absence of a loving relationship with their own bodies, minds, and souls.- Bessel van der Kolk, MD
#thebodykeepsthescore #besselvanderkolk #cptsd #did #internalfamilysystems #partswork #childhoodtrauma #ptsd #somaticexperiencing #dissociation #dissociativedisorder #addiction #healingtrauma.

We all know what happens when we feel humiliated: We put all our energy into protecting ourselves, developing whatever survival strategies we can. We may repress our feelings; we may get furious and plot revenge. We may decide to become so powerful and successful that nobody can ever hurt us again. Many behaviors that are classified as psychiatric problems, including some obsessions, compulsions, and panic attacks, as well as most self-destructive behaviors, started out as strategies for self-protection. These adaptations to trauma can so interfere with the capacity to function that health-care providers and patients themselves often believe that full recovery is beyond reach. Viewing these symptoms as permanent disabilities narrows the focus of treatment to finding the proper drug regimen, which can lead to lifelong dependence—as though trauma survivors were like kidney patients on dialysis. It is much more productive to see aggression or depression, arrogance or passivity as learned behaviors: Somewhere along the line, the patient came to believe that he or she could survive only if he or she was tough, invisible, or absent, or that it was safer to give up. Like traumatic memories that keep intruding until they are laid to rest, traumatic adaptations continue until the human organism feels safe and integrates all the parts of itself that are stuck in fighting or warding off the trauma. Every trauma survivor I’ve met is resilient in his or her own way, and every one of their stories inspires awe at how people cope. Knowing how much energy the sheer act of survival requires keeps me from being surprised at the price they often pay: the absence of a loving relationship with their own bodies, minds, and souls.- Bessel van der Kolk, MD #thebodykeepsthescore #besselvanderkolk #cptsd #did #internalfamilysystems #partswork #childhoodtrauma #ptsd #somaticexperiencing #dissociation #dissociativedisorder #addiction #healingtrauma ...

Since then neuroscience research has shown that we possess two distinct forms of self-awareness: one that keeps track of the self across time and one that registers the self in the present moment. The first, our autobiographical self, creates connections among experiences and assembles them into a coherent story. This system is rooted in language. Our narratives change with the telling, as our perspective changes and as we incorporate new input.

The other system, moment-to-moment self-awareness, is based primarily in physical sensations, but if we feel safe and are not rushed, we can find words to communicate that experience as well. These two ways of knowing are localized in different parts of the brain that are largely disconnected from each other. Only the system devoted to self-awareness, which is based in the medial prefrontal cortex, can change the emotional brain.

The neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux and his colleagues have shown that the only way we can consciously access the emotional brain is through self-awareness, i.e. by activating the medial prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that notices what is going on inside us and thus allows us to feel what we’re feeling. (The technical term for this is “interoception”—Latin for “looking inside.”) -Dr. Bessel van der Kolk 
#besselvanderkolk
#thebodykeepsthescore
#ptsd
#cptsd
#traumaticstress
#depression #anxiety
#hypervigilance
#developmentaltrauma #traumasensitiveyoga #neuroplasticity #traumainformedyoga #bpd #dissociation #dissociativeidentitydisorder #dissociativedisorder #borderline #mindfulness #meditation #psychomotortherapy #vipassana 
#traumainformed 
#bpd #ocd #emdr #somaticexperiencing 
#selfawareness #talktherapy.

Since then neuroscience research has shown that we possess two distinct forms of self-awareness: one that keeps track of the self across time and one that registers the self in the present moment. The first, our autobiographical self, creates connections among experiences and assembles them into a coherent story. This system is rooted in language. Our narratives change with the telling, as our perspective changes and as we incorporate new input. The other system, moment-to-moment self-awareness, is based primarily in physical sensations, but if we feel safe and are not rushed, we can find words to communicate that experience as well. These two ways of knowing are localized in different parts of the brain that are largely disconnected from each other. Only the system devoted to self-awareness, which is based in the medial prefrontal cortex, can change the emotional brain. The neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux and his colleagues have shown that the only way we can consciously access the emotional brain is through self-awareness, i.e. by activating the medial prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that notices what is going on inside us and thus allows us to feel what we’re feeling. (The technical term for this is “interoception”—Latin for “looking inside.”) -Dr. Bessel van der Kolk #besselvanderkolk #thebodykeepsthescore #ptsd #cptsd #traumaticstress #depression #anxiety #hypervigilance #developmentaltrauma #traumasensitiveyoga #neuroplasticity #traumainformedyoga #bpd #dissociation #dissociativeidentitydisorder #dissociativedisorder #borderline #mindfulness #meditation #psychomotortherapy #vipassana #traumainformed #bpd #ocd #emdr #somaticexperiencing #selfawareness #talktherapy ...

For a long time I felt afraid that if I didn’t remember everything that happened to me then I wouldn’t heal, but I also felt really afraid to remember everything.
✨
Since becoming a therapist that works primarily with trauma, and continuing my own journey without remembering everything, I’ve learned that remembering can look a lot of different ways and that remembering everything is not necessary. ✨
The reality is that sometimes our body remembers what our mind cannot. We feel these memories in the form of sensations, anxiety, or just a general sense that something bad happened. ✨
Sometimes trauma happens when we are so little that we don’t have words or a framework yet to make sense of it. Instead it informs our very conception of ourselves and the world. ✨
Sometimes to survive what has happened we dissociate so completely that we don’t remember what happened in a clear and concise narrative. Trauma memory can be stored differently from regular memory. ✨
We remember what we have been through, just not always in a way that can be easily communicated or understood. Instead we may live in a minefield of procedural memories that are constantly eliciting sensations that feel intolerable and sending us messages to avoid anything reminiscent of our trauma. The sensations may not totally make sense to us.
✨
The key is not always to make that which is implicit, explicit, but to restore a sense of safety in our being by slowly increasing our window of tolerance around that which our body remembers. This may help our bodies complete an unfinished survival response. This may result in certain experiences becoming more clear but it also may not. ✨
We can attend to and honour what our body remembers. Our culture asks for a narrative that is perfectly clear, linear and detailed. This does harm to folks who have survived horrendous things and yet cannot put words or a narrative to it. ✨
Your sense of what happened is enough. Your inner knowing is enough. You don’t need to remember in the ways that our culture emphasizes in order to heal..

For a long time I felt afraid that if I didn’t remember everything that happened to me then I wouldn’t heal, but I also felt really afraid to remember everything. ✨ Since becoming a therapist that works primarily with trauma, and continuing my own journey without remembering everything, I’ve learned that remembering can look a lot of different ways and that remembering everything is not necessary. ✨ The reality is that sometimes our body remembers what our mind cannot. We feel these memories in the form of sensations, anxiety, or just a general sense that something bad happened. ✨ Sometimes trauma happens when we are so little that we don’t have words or a framework yet to make sense of it. Instead it informs our very conception of ourselves and the world. ✨ Sometimes to survive what has happened we dissociate so completely that we don’t remember what happened in a clear and concise narrative. Trauma memory can be stored differently from regular memory. ✨ We remember what we have been through, just not always in a way that can be easily communicated or understood. Instead we may live in a minefield of procedural memories that are constantly eliciting sensations that feel intolerable and sending us messages to avoid anything reminiscent of our trauma. The sensations may not totally make sense to us. ✨ The key is not always to make that which is implicit, explicit, but to restore a sense of safety in our being by slowly increasing our window of tolerance around that which our body remembers. This may help our bodies complete an unfinished survival response. This may result in certain experiences becoming more clear but it also may not. ✨ We can attend to and honour what our body remembers. Our culture asks for a narrative that is perfectly clear, linear and detailed. This does harm to folks who have survived horrendous things and yet cannot put words or a narrative to it. ✨ Your sense of what happened is enough. Your inner knowing is enough. You don’t need to remember in the ways that our culture emphasizes in order to heal. ...

Most Recent

READING IS BLISS: ✨ On my journey of self-care I've always found myself intensely curious to try so many things & while some have worked, others I'm still getting the hang of it (like cooking, I'm still figuring out how cooking is relaxing for people?? 🤔 lol). However, of all the things I try to do for self-care, one thing that has always been true to me is the love I have for reading 📖. The magic of getting lost in a good book and allowing myself to dive into a new world, new topics, new stories..even if for just a few pages, those moments are bliss. Any one else relate? 🙋🏼‍♀️
.
.
.
A *fun fact* about me is that besides my love of all things 🌿 herbalism, I'm an LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) and a TF-CBT (Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) Credentialed Clinician which means I provide trauma focused psychotherapy to children and families 👨‍👩‍👧‍👦. While this work is emotionally intense on most days (hence my ongoing self-care journey🙃), I am constantly inspired by the strength and resiliency of my clients. This book

READING IS BLISS: ✨ On my journey of self-care I've always found myself intensely curious to try so many things & while some have worked, others I'm still getting the hang of it (like cooking, I'm still figuring out how cooking is relaxing for people?? 🤔 lol). However, of all the things I try to do for self-care, one thing that has always been true to me is the love I have for reading 📖. The magic of getting lost in a good book and allowing myself to dive into a new world, new topics, new stories..even if for just a few pages, those moments are bliss. Any one else relate? 🙋🏼‍♀️ . . . A *fun fact* about me is that besides my love of all things 🌿 herbalism, I'm an LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) and a TF-CBT (Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) Credentialed Clinician which means I provide trauma focused psychotherapy to children and families 👨‍👩‍👧‍👦. While this work is emotionally intense on most days (hence my ongoing self-care journey🙃), I am constantly inspired by the strength and resiliency of my clients. This book "The Body Keeps the Score" by @bessel_van has been highly recommended to me by professors, supervisors, and colleagues to name a few and currently one of my favorite IG pages @vyana.novus is adding this book to their month of June Book Club series and I am so excited to finally dive in! I invite you to read along with me 🌱as we know with the current state of our country & politics there is a lot to learn about how trauma not only affects our minds/bodies but also our energy systems and overall society 📚 #knowledgeheals . . . . #wildcraftedbliss #reading #herbalism #holistichealing #ayurveda #lcsw #thebodykeepsthescore #apothecary #myherbalstudies #herbalhealing #selflove #selfcare #plantlady #selfcarematters #handmadewithlove #letplantshealyou #naturalskincare #essentialoils #crystals #crystalhealing #reiki #chakras #wild #wildcrafted #bliss #supportlocalbusinenesses #womenempowerment #connecticut #ct ...

"Our great teacher, Elvin Semrad, actively discouraged us from reading psychiatry textbooks during our first year...Semrad did not want our perceptions of reality to become obscured by the pseudocertainties of psychiatric diagnoses. I remember asking him once: What would you call this patient - schizophrenic or schizoaffective?' He paused and stroked his chin, apparently in deep thought. 'I think I'd call him Michael McIntyre,' he replied. ********** Semrad taught us that most human suffering is related to love and loss and that the job of therapist is to help people 'acknowledge, experience, and bear' the reality of life - with all its pleasures and heartbreak. ' The greatest sources of our suffering are the lies we tell ourselves,' he'd say, urging us to be honest with ourselves about every facet of our experience. He often said that people can never get better without knowing what they know and feeling what the feel. ********** I remember being surprised to hear this distinguished old Harvard professor confess how comforted he was to feel his wife's bum against him as he fell asleep at night. By disclosing such simple human needs in himself he helped us recognize how basic they were to our lives. Failure to attend to them results in a stunted existence, no matter how lofty our thoughts and worldly accomplishments. Healing, he told us, depends on experiential knowledge: You can be fully in charge of your life only if you can acknowledge the reality of your body, in all its visceral dimensions." ********** - The Body Keeps the Score, by Bessel A. Van der Kolk, M.D. (p. 26-27) ********** "After the war his patients were overtaken by a sense of futility; they became withdrawn and detached, even if they had functioned well before..post-traumatic stress isn't 'all in one's head,' as some people supposed, but has a physiological basis...the symptoms have their origin in the entire body's response to the original trauma...Working at the VA I soon discovered how excruciating it can be to face reality. This was true both for my patients and for myself." (p. 11) ********** *Pictured: The Tragedy, by Pablo Picasso, 1903. ********** #thebodykeepsthescore #trauma #healing ...

I was recently doing the #6phasemeditation and this quote is in there too.  It's so true. Sadley, the cycle of trama is hard to stop.
@hussein_dj_a_slam

#toxicmasculinity
#bodykeepsthescore  #thebodykeepsthescore
#meditation.

I was recently doing the #6phasemeditation and this quote is in there too. It's so true. Sadley, the cycle of trama is hard to stop. @hussein_dj_a_slam #toxicmasculinity #bodykeepsthescore #thebodykeepsthescore #meditation ...

So I’ve been on school break for over a week now and have not accomplished much. I wanted to read at least two books before #summersemester starts, so I finally ordered this one my therapist recommended to me like a year ago. This week I’ll be alternating reading this and bingeing #lucifer . #amazonprimebooks #nursingstudent #thebodykeepsthescore #healing #trauma.

So I’ve been on school break for over a week now and have not accomplished much. I wanted to read at least two books before #summersemester starts, so I finally ordered this one my therapist recommended to me like a year ago. This week I’ll be alternating reading this and bingeing #lucifer . #amazonprimebooks #nursingstudent #thebodykeepsthescore #healing #trauma ...